Norman Mailer: The Castle in the Forest

April 19, 2008

This daringly original masterpiece deals with one of the demonic historical characters in the XXth century, namely Adolf Hitler. After having done the story of Jesus, Mailer swapped poles in his literary axis, depicting the boyhood of Little Adi, who happens to be the ‘child’ of an incestous marriage. Deftly enough, Mailer createsan appropriate agent to observe and to eyewitness the bringing-up of Herr Wolf. This agent is sent by Satan in the form of a demon, which I believe to be an apt idea.

This masterpiece (I am calling this book as a masterpiece based on no reading experience)is mixing fiction with facts(as told by reviews), and has of course been added to my reading list.

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3 Responses to “Norman Mailer: The Castle in the Forest”

  1. nezsike Says:

    ive read this and i hated the idea of having to read it because it was obligatory. then i started reading it, i didnt understand it, then i understood it, and i grew to like it. that is, if u can say ‘like’ to a book/subject like this. but yea, read it, i think its smth for u.

  2. kelemenzsolt Says:

    ok, i think im too slow for this, you alread had to read this stuff? was it mandatory? christ, where did you study?:D
    no ,don’t answer it, i know, but still…:D
    the story is kinda cool for it shows the most controversial figure of the XXth cent, creating an observer, who sees all filth, which surrounded Hitler’s way to be the prior Nazi…Am i right?

  3. nezsike Says:

    it wasnt school, it was theater .. quite recently, actually.


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